Nerethra [Fantasy Game]

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14ascheck
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Nerethra [Fantasy Game]

Post by 14ascheck » Thu Jun 25, 2009 7:33 am

OK, this is a game I was working on long, long ago. I have a line of miniatures for it, although right now they are 2-D (I'll explain this shortly,) and several Books of Lore (the equivalent of a Codex or Army Book,) as well as the main rulebook, although the background section was still underway when I got bored of it. It's pretty old, from when I was eight, so I was wondering if anyone was interested in helping me with upgrading it to a 40K or FoW standard. Here are the Books of Lore (I've turned up another one, but it's half done,) and the rulebook. Tell me what you think. P.S. I hadn't playtested it yet, so there're no points costs.

Nerethra

Nerethra is a game in which you build up your armies, then lead them to war to obliterate all who stand against you. It is a game of cunning and strategy, or brute force and slaughter, whichever you prefer. So let's delve into this world of life and death, victory and defeat.

The Countries

The first step here is to pick your army. This is the force which you will use on the battlefield. Here is an overview of all of the armies found in Nerethra.
Elegia
The Druchae
Methana
Salik
The Zilanchi are another country, probably the foulest of all. The Zilanchi are much like the Salik, but they are stronger, more deadly, and they wield much more powerful magics. Their ruling caste wear long cloaks, while their serfs wear chain mail. The serfs themselves are weak, only viable for military service because of their magic. The Zilanchi cavalry is called the Ilithik. These Zilanchi are lesser nobles, who ride nightmarish horses which flicker and dissipate like smoke as they move. The Zilanchi are a small nation, on the northern fringes of the world, and they ride to war often, if only for the ecstasy that comes with the pain of others. Their sadism knows no bounds; many say they are no more than a physical manifestation of pain incarnate. Yet as time has gone on, their evil has infected the land they live on. The only reason the Zilanchi have never been conquered by larger nations is that no army can invade and survive off of the barren lands. In fact, the land is so evil, supply convoys and scouts have been found, destroyed by freak earthquakes or falling into pits. Indeed, the Zilanchi are the most twisted race of Nerethra.
Also known as Ironfolk, the Methond were born from stone and given life. Ever since, these truculent little fellows trundle about their halls, delighting in the stonework and carvings on the walls. Yet often, they are threatened by their greatest enemy, the Tsang Virai, and they take up their war hammers to obliterate the invaders. The Cursed Isle also remains just offshore, and they must battle against this as well. So the Methond are no stranger to war; do not underestimate them due to their size, they have the courage and heart of kings. Leading them are the Ironborn, strong and clever Methond who wield war hammers of unparalleled size. To guard them, the Ironguard stands ready; and, if needed, the common Methond will raise his hammer, blink his stone eyes, and charge into the fray as Ironfolk. While they are pleasant and welcoming in peace, they will fight to the death in war. So live the Methond.
Darnor
Paknir
Elves
Tsang Virai
The Druids
The Cursed Isle
Karoth
Kobolds
Ulthania
The Caveborn

The Rules

These rules are fairly simple, so that you can play fast, yet fun games. Each turn has a basic organization.
1. Attacker moves.
2. Defender moves.
3. Attacker shoots.
4. Defender shoots.
5. Attacker charges.
6. Defender charges.
7. Attacker melees.
8. Defender melees.
9. Magic Phase (Throughout all of the above)
In this way, things are kept fairly up to date in the game. You can either designate an attacker, or have a rolling match. This is effectively a show down between dice, where you roll, and the highest picks which of the (usually two) choices he prefers. If it's a tie, reroll. On to formations.

Formations are made for ease of playing. You have to understand that Epic is a game of massed troops, where a battalion can cover a few square inches. So formations are when troops are gathered to move, etc., together. It depends on the time period and the type of soldier just how many troops are in a formation, but for these rules we are going to assume that one subunit is two ranks of five. Now one of the advantages of the formation is that you can move them together. To do this, take one of our formation bases, print it out on cardboard paper, (although I find construction paper, usually green, to be the coolest, although sometimes it bends to easily,) bend the ends as shown, and you can snugly fit the troops in. Make sure that the formation bases are the right ones for the subunit. That word has come up twice now; a subunit is one group on the same base. A unit is a group of subunits, usually four, that make up one group, such as a regiment. For example: four subunits, each two ranks of six, make up one Man at Arms Company. Simple. Oh, and one big point: you cannot augment the bases. Since measuring is performed from the edge of the formation's base, you can actually strengthen/weaken a unit in this way. Make sure your opponent doesn't mind this. Now to the turn.

The movement phase is simple. Each side moves. Check the specific scenario for the statistics of the participants. A move is usually a few inches. You can change direction only once in a move, unless the unit's rules say otherwise. This is simply because especially in the age of linear warfare changing direction meant completely reorganizing the formation, so it was something not done unless necessary. In any case, it can take some time, so only once per move may you turn them. There is, however, no limit of degrees the turn may be a complete reversal, or a simple quarter turn. It's up to you. Almost all cavalry may make two turns, but it's easier for us just to write it in in the unit's rules in the scenario, since there can be exceptions.
Terrain is also an important aspect of movement. Naturally you can't just move through a house, woods, etc. We'll cover these elements one at a time.
Terrain that is hard to traverse. With this, it can vary slightly. In woods, a swamp, etc., it's usually best to say that a unit may only move half of its usual movement value. You can also limit this by percentage, or taking of an inch or two, depending on just how obstructive the terrain is. We suggest, however, that you use the previously mentioned method as a default. We also suggest that a subunit must split into skirmish form to enter terrain.
Buildings. We believe in making games realistic, so why shouldn't troops be able to enter buildings? Naturally cavalry and other such things should be kept out of this rule, but infantry can garrison houses. See cover saves, below. To move into a building, just place the subunit moving in onto it, or take it off the field and leave a marker, etc., to show where it is. Also, a building should have a capacity. Naturally you can't put a regiment into one farmhouse. In general, one subunit is the best capacity.
The last aspect that is in the movement category is skirmishing. This isn't really movement, more a variation of formations, but we decided to put it here. The basic idea is that a subunit wants to break up, instead of staying in formation. You'll probably find that units will want to go into skirmish for two main reasons: one, a subunit can split fire, (see shooting,) and two, a subunit may need to to traverse terrain. To go into skirmish form, you must, however, sacrifice 20%/one fifth of your movement. If there is an ongoing decimal in eighths of inches, round up. Many units are Skirmishers, and thus do not have to sacrifice this percentage.

The shooting phase is also fairly easy. All you do is select which units that are able to shoot you wish to shoot with, and they fire. To do this, you must first determine range.
To be in range, the unit you are firing at must be at least as close as the number of inches in the Range statistic box in the firing unit's profile. Measure from the edge of the formation's base. A formation must be facing the enemy with it front rank to fire. If the front rank can reach the enemy, the whole formation may fire. If it is within range, then you may shoot. To determine which firing value you use, check the distance again. If the range is half of the firing unit's total range or more, use its Far Shot value. If it doesn't have one, just use the Shot value. A Shot value has a number and usually a plus sign. For example, 4+. This means you need to roll at least a four for each soldier in the unit. The only time there isn't a plus sign is if it's a six, because you can't have more than six. Note that a formation may only shoot at one target.
So you roll one die for each soldier in the formation. Then, you tally up the hits. For example, a subunit of eight troops is shooting and needs a 4+ to hit. The subunit rolls five hits, so the enemy would lose five soldiers. However, there are also saves. A conventional save is on the unit's profile, for example 5+. So if the defending subunit rolls two saves, the attacking/firing unit only kills three of the defenders.
There are, however, several other saves. The first is the cover save. You must assign each piece of terrain on the field with a cover save, or state that it has none. For example, if the defending subunit is in a building made of wood, a 4+ or 5+ save would be typical. For a stone wall, probably a 4+. For trees, a 4+, as the troops are concealed. And for a swamp, maybe a 6, since there could be brush, etc. You get the idea.
The other save is the skirmish form save. This save comes from a formation going into skirmishing form. It is almost always 6. While we are on skirmishing formations, I should mention two things, splitting fire and loss of directed fire. Loss of directed fire is simple. For every hit you make with a subunit in skirmishing form, roll a die. On a one, the hit doesn't count. Splitting fire is equally simple. While a subunit in standard formation is only capable of selecting one target, a skirmishing subunit may split its unit in half and shoot at one target with each half.

Charging is the shortest timewise of all the phases. You simply select all units that are capable of charging and that you want to charge, and they advance by a number of inches given on their unit statistics. Their front rank must be able to make solid contact with either an enemy unit's side, front, or back. You may not charge if you cannot hit an enemy unit. Then you proceed to melee.

The melee phase is fairly quick. All units in contact with an enemy unit must melee. You cannot skip a melee. To execute a melee, just use the Melee Value statistic on the unit's profile. It, like the shooting one, should look like 2+, 3+, etc. Then, just like shooting, you roll to hit, and then for saves. Note that only conventional saves (ones on the unit's profile,) count in melee. You then remove casualties from the back ranks.
While we're here, there is one more factor of the game. Morale. Morale is also quite simple. If a subunit loses 50% of all its troops in one turn, make a morale save. The number you need (3+,4+, etc.) is indicated in the unit profile. If it fails, the subunit must retreat as far as its movement allows, towards the board edge from where it came. Note that if it came on in a different area from the rest of the army, it will fall back towards them. At the beginning of every turn, take a morale save. If you succeed, the unit turns about and is ready to move as normal. If it fails, keep running. A unit attacked while retreating surrenders and is removed without a fight. If a morale save is unusual, such as one caused by a spell, etc., roll it at the end of the phase, unless stated otherwise.

The magic phase is different from all other phases for one simple reason: it isn't one. We have only called it a phase because it makes things simpler. While phases are parts of a whole turn, the magic phase goes on throughout the turn. Use magic when it is directed in the spell. If it requires a harnessing test to control the magic in use, roll a die. On a 1, you fail the spell, and nothing happens.

There are also several types of troops. These are irrelevant except in special rules, where some examples exclude some types. For example, an instant kill spell may be usable against anything except commanders and heroes, since they're too powerful to make that fair.

I realize these rules are quite loose and don't cover a few things. That's intentional, as they're more a guide than a real rulebook. Just tweak thing or add things to suit your needs. This makes for a more precise gaming experience.

A final thing is historical combat. There are four ages of Nerethran history: the Early Age, the Middle Age, the Golden Age, and the New Age. Almost all heroes have assigned ages. While you do not have to play this way, as it can be hard sometimes to organize a game that way, (for example: both sides have picked characters to fit their armies perfectly, but they are from different ages, which will inconvenience one or both of them, as they will have to pick a character to match the other's age,) we suggest that in a campaign you apply this. In historical refights, you will obviously also have to do this.
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14ascheck
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Re: Nerethra [Fantasy Game]

Post by 14ascheck » Thu Jun 25, 2009 7:34 am

The Druchae

This Book of Lore is on the Druchae, a brutal coalition on warriors from the southwestern reaches of Nerethra. Led by the Half Dragon Lords, they pillage and slaughter in sea going crusades and massive wars on land. Read on to discover more about these merciless fighters.

The Druchae Army

The Druchae have four basic army designs. The first is the Elite army, composed mostly of half dragons, the toughest, most resilient fighters of the Druchae. These are usually led by their Half Dragon Lords, and an emphasis on Heroes can often add a very unique feel to the army.
The second type of army is the Fast army. Raiders are a solid core in this army, followed by many corrupted archers and corrupted auxiliaries. Arnuch Foeseeker is a superb choice, being an archer, although a corrupted warlord can do the trick.
Another common army is the Wraith army. This army is made out of a mix of Erethnikai and raiders. The Erethnikai should form a large part of your army, as they can redeploy quickly. The raiders are also useful, since they can move quickly and are great hit and run fighters. This army is like smoke on the wind; especially armies with little Cavalry are stymied by this army.
The last type of typical Druchae army is the Standard army. This contains a mix, led by a Half Dragon Lord, and is great if you're fighting in tournaments as it is quite versatile.

Spells are very useful to the Druchae; while their Spellcasting area leaves much to be desired, the Half Dragon Lords more than make up for this deficiency. NOTE: Each spell may only be used once per turn by the same unit.
Defy Good: The Druchae despise all that is beautiful and good, so they have trained themselves to repel these powers; over the years, the spell has begun to function against all enemies. When this spell is cast, a selected enemy formation must take a morale test. If they are already fleeing, they must run their full move. Should this be impossible, they must move as far as they can. This spell cannot be cast during a melee. Range: 16".
Summon Pain: Long ago, the half dragons mastered the art of bringing down pain upon their enemies. When this spell is cast, select an enemy formation. Then, roll a D3 (see Nerethran rulebook.) The number rolled represents the number of wounds to that formation. Note that this spell does not affect Heroes, Spellcasters, Commanders, or Siege Weapons. Range: 12".
Obliterate: The Druchae have also mastered the art of completely destroying an area around them. The caster of this spell hits every unit within 5", excluding the caster itself. One 1+ hit is directed at each base within range; they may then take conventional saves.
Soul Sapping: Erethnikai have a natural ability to remove the souls of enemies, being soulless themselves. An enemy formation engaged in a melee with the caster(s) must roll a die. If they roll 5-6, they suffer one 4+ hit. On a 3-4, they suffer two 4+ hits. And on a 1-2, they suffer three 4+ hits. Only magical saves (ones caused by spells, etc.) This spell cannot hurt Commanders, Heroes, or Siege Weapons.
Resound: Many Druchae generals can make their battle cries echo for minutes on end using magical amplifiers. The caster may select any one friendly formation within range of this spell. If the formation is fleeing, that formation may take a morale test, no matter what phase it is. If it passes, it immediately reforms. If the formation is not fleeing, it may take a free charge, (only in the charge phase, however,) even if it is the opponent's phase. Range: 12".

The Druchae have a wealth of heroes and soldiers they can call upon in need. This is a list of all of them, and their rules. Here is an example profile.
Name
Description
Points Cost. Cost to buy a unit or formation.
Speed. The amount of inches that this unit may move.
Attack. The die roll needed to wound an enemy.
Conventional Save. The save needed to deflect an attack.
Range. How far the model can shoot, measured from its base. If it says melee, the unit may only attack enemies in base contact. First Hit Melee is equally straightforward. This unit may strike before the other in melee.
Morale. The unit's morale save. If it says Fearless, it means that the unit passes all test automatically.
Life. The amount of hits the unit can take before it is removed.
Spells & Items. Any spells or items the unit can buy, and the points cost.
Special Rules. Any special rules that apply.

Heroes

Ethk (Early Age)
Ethk was a drake of tremendous power who fought with the Druchae and terrorized the Elegians for many years, before he was lured into a trap by the Dawn King. Then he was cloven in half in a narrow cave, so small he could not turn around to attack the Dawn King, who had hidden in a fissure. Regardless of this unpleasant fate, Ethk was and still is considered the greatest drake of all time, both in strength and in cunning. He often devised traps himself, into which he would lure Elegian armies before killing them.
PC.
S. 10"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. 8"
M. Fearless
L. 5
S. None.
SR. Flying: Drakes may pass over all terrain as though it were clear. They may not stop in a piece of terrain, such as a wall, however.

Arnuch Foeseeker (Middle Age)
Even during times of peace, Elegian peasants whispered about a man to fast to be caught by any knights. He led his corrupted warriors in daring hit and run attacks, so meticulously planned that no Elegian trap could catch him. Yet one time, he was hit by an arrow in the head. Everyone thought him to be dead, but shortly thereafter, he arose, completely alive. Only one thing had changed. His left eye was blood red. After that, he developed a particular quirk. Every enemy who wounded him, he hunted down. He would lead his men across Elegia if it meant finding the one and killing him. He killed any man who touched the man before he did. So was Arnuch Foeseeker, the most feared, the least seen.
PC.
S. 5"
A. 2+
CS. 3+
R. 9"
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. Resound.
SR. Foeseeker: Any unit that wounds Arnuch automatically suffers from a 2+ attack.

The Moon Lord (All Ages)
The Moon Lord is an immortal being, the master of all Erethnikai. Throughout the ages, he has wandered, sometimes leading armies against his enemies, sometimes for his own ends. The Ulthanian prince Mirithial cut his robe, and was shocked to find only empty, gray souls, sucked dry of all meaning and life, flow forth. Ever since, one can look through his cloak and see them, the tortured faces of his victims. Mirithial is often foremost in this spectral host. The Moon Lord cooperates often with the Half Dragon Lords, but never takes orders from anyone.
PC.
S. 6"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 4
S. Sap Soul.
SR. Ethereal: The Moon Lord may pass through terrain as though it were clear ground. Note that he cannot stop inside of a wall or other terrain feature.

Shrak (Middle Age)
Shrak's deeds are to many to recount; his most famous are the pillage of southern Elegia, the killing of Moriathor Dragonslayer, and his crossing the Sea of Pain are but a few. He also invaded Elegia many times besides, and performed a tactical masterpiece at the Battle of Gthrish, where he trapped the Elegian knights, killed them with his archers, and then, with the Elegian army all out of its strongest fighters, he surrounded them and destroyed them in a series of attacks including Drake assaults, hit and run attacks, and finally an all out charge by his half dragons.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 3+
CS. 3+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. Obliterate.
SR. Brilliant Tactician: All friendly formations within 8" of Shrak automatically pass all morale tests.

Driach (Early Age)
Driach was the first Half Dragon Lord to truly unite the Druchae and pillage Elegia. Ironically, he also united the Elegians, who were forced together by the danger to their survival. Driach was eventually beaten, killed in single combat by the Dawn King, but prior to this he was still the greatest of the Half Dragon Lords, and was matched only by Shrak, who rampaged across Elegia with equal success. Driach was not the tactical mastermind Shrak was to become known as, but he inspired his army and was an incredible fighter.
PC.
S. 5"
A. 2+
CS. 3+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. Defy Good.
SR. None.

Erlon (Golden Age)
While Erlon's rule was very brief, he managed to rally the Druchae so firmly that they even regrouped again after he had died, something no other had done. While considered weak by half dragon standards, he was a brilliant diplomat, paying his warriors with land and money, as well as spoils and slaves. This brilliant infrastructure held the army together. However, he could also be brutal if it was necessary. He made examples of any who tried to revoke their contracts.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 3+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. Summon Pain.
SR. None.

Irithka (New Age)
While mostly untested, Irithk has proven herself capable of leading her armies into war. She prefers to fight with her fellow half dragons, and dislikes the Erethnikai, (for even Druchae fear the soulless ones,) but leads her warriors with inspiring examples which often bring the armies victory with massive charges and assaults. She seems to even somewhat respect the Ulthanians for their art, something unprecedented among the callous Druchae.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 3+
CS. 3+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. Defy Good.
SR. None.


Commanders

Half Dragon Lord
The Half Dragon Lords crush all in their path. A half dragon is stronger than a human, and their rulers are handpicked from the best of their kind. Huge swathes of warriors die before them. To stand in the path of a Half Dragon Lord is to condemn oneself.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 3+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. Defy Good.
SR. None.

Corrupted Lord
The corrupted warriors need leaders, since Half Dragon Lords are not always available. So they pick the strongest and most cunning warrior they can find and make him their lord. He then leads them into battle, and they slaughter all before them.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 3+
CS. 4+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. None.
SR. None.

Retinues

Druchae Retinue (Formation; 1 Stand)
The Druchae leaders often use Druchae Retinues as personal bodyguards to assure their survival in the confusion of battle. These retinues are, therefore, an elite force, and one to be reckoned with. All Heroes and Commanders may take an Druchae Retinue for its points cost.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 3+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Fanatical: All hits directed at the Druchae Retinue's lord are transferred to the Druchae Retinue automatically.

Infantry

Corrupted Men (Formation; 6 Stands)
From the wastes of Orbarach come the vicious and depraved warriors, the corrupted warriors. Among these are the Corrupted Men, warriors who tote spears onto the battlefield to assault the enemies of the Druchae.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 5+
R. First Hit Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. None.
Corrupted Captain (Part of Corrupted Men Formation; Command Stand) Commander
The fastest, most cunning warriors of the corrupted men are quickly promoted to Corrupted Captains,who lead their soldiers into battle, screaming and howling for fresh killings.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 4+
R. First Hit Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. None.

Corrupted Auxiliaries (Formation; 6 Stands)
The Corrupted Auxiliaries bear both spear and bow, and are a very versatile unit on the battlefield. Often, the first rank repels cavalry attacks which were already weakened through the relentless bombardment of the second rank.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 5+
CS. 5+
R. First Hit Melee (First Rank,) 8" (Second Rank)
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Versatile: The first rank, with spears, must always fight first. It receives the attack listed. The second rank, however, is busy firing arrows, so it receives only a 6 attack.
Corrupted Lieutenant (Part of Corrupted Auxiliaries Formation; Command Stand) Commander
The warriors of the auxiliaries also select their warriors to lead them, but these are tacticians, skilled in the art of deploying and using a formation so radically different through ranks.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 5+
CS. 4+
R. First Hit Melee M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Versatile: The first rank, with spears, must always fight first. It receives the attack listed. The second rank, however, is busy firing arrows, so it receives only a 6 attack. NOTE: The Corrupted Lieutenant is always a first ranker.

Corrupted Archers (Formation; 6 Stands)
Corrupted Archers are the least respected by their kin, but the Druchae value them greatly, as they are virtually the only archers the army possesses. This makes them an invaluable asset, and they fight hard to prove it.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 5+
R. 8"
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Light Archers: In melee, the Corrupted Archers only hit on a 6.
Corrupted Sergeant (Part of Corrupted Archers Formation; Command Stand) Commander
The Corrupted Sergeants are probably weaker than the captains and lieutenants, but they are skulking tricksters, who use their wit and cunning to make up for their lack of strength.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 4+
R. 8"
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Light Archers: In melee, the Corrupted Archers only hit on a 6.

Half Dragon Company (Formation; 4 Stands)
A Half Dragon Company is formed from half dragon warriors intent on glory and killings. These somewhat fanatical soldiers are much stronger than humans, and an elite force in the armies of the Druchae.
PC.
S. 5"
A. 2+
CS. 3+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S. None.
SR. None.
Half Dragon Commander (Part of Half Dragon Formation; Command Stand) Commander
The Half Dragon Commanders are secobnd only to the Half Dragon Lords. These intrepid soldiers lead their companies into the fray, butcvhering the enemies of the Druchae.
PC.
S. 5"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S. None.
SR. None.

Cavalry

Raider Band (Formation; 4 Stands)
The Raiders are corrupted warriors who ride on their horses, making incredible hit and run attacks on enemy formations. The only way to take them down, according to most Elegian generals, is to bombard them with the ranger's arrows. Eventually, the Raiders are whittled down and killed, but they still fight incredibly hard. Armies with weak archers will be slaughtered to a man.
PC.
S. 8"
A. 3+
CS. 4+
R. First Hit Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Hit and Run: A Raider Formation may, in the assault phase, charge a unit. It then fights the full melee. Then roll a die. On a 1-3, the Raiders are unable to get out of the melee and must remain. But on a 4-6, they may immediately turn and ride their full move. Note that it must be away, towards their table edge, unless there is an enemy in the way.
Raider Warlord (Part of Raider Formation; Command Stand) Commander
The Raider Warlords are the equivalent of the corrupted captains, but mounted. They lead the raiders, deciding when to strike, and they do it with terrifying precision. Few live to tell of their attacks.
PC.
S. 8"
A. 3+
CS. 4+
R. First Hit Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S.
SR. Hit and Run: A Raider Formation may, in the assault phase, charge a unit. It then fights the full melee. Then roll a die. On a 1-3, the Raiders are unable to get out of the melee and must remain. But on a 4-6, they may immediately turn and ride their full move. Note that it must be away, towards their table edge, unless there is an enemy in the way.

Spellcasters

Erethnikai (Formation; 4 Stands)
The half dragons are fearsome, the corrupted bloodthirsty, the Erethnikai, soulless. None can equal their completely impassive stares. They feel no joy, and have only one wish. To take all pure souls with them, back to their home on the moon of Nerethra. To this aim, they have joined the Druchae, whose souls are already wasted and marred, and they go to war, always seeking souls.
PC.
S. 6"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S. Defy Good, Soul Sap, Summon Pain.
SR. None.
Erethnikai Taxmaster (Part of Erethnikai Formation; Command Stand) Commander
The Erethnikai are not led by the Taxmasters, but follow them, for their acute sight aids them in finding the purest souls of all to harvest. They then collect them, and move on, always seeking, always thirsting.
PC.
S. 6"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S. Defy Good, Soul Sap, Summon Pain.
SR. None.

Siege Weapons

Drake
The most feared creatures of the Druchae, the Drakes represent unstoppable killing weapons. While they are actually flesh and bone, they are so massive and powerful, many view them as the Druchae equivalent of the catapult, belching fire and death upon their enemies.
PC.
S. 10"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. 8"
M. Fearless
L. 4
S&I. None.
SR. Flying: Drakes may pass over all terrain as though it were clear. They may not stop in a piece of terrain, such as a wall, however.

The Story of the Druchae

The Druchae rule only periodically. Often, its armies sit idle, pillaging only occasionally. It is the Half Dragon Lords that rally these forces, molding them into one, great army, which they lead into the lands of their enemies. The corrupted warriors are gathered from their lands in Orbarach, the half dragons come down from their strongholds, and the Erethnikai float from their many hiding places, while the drakes fly down from the great mountains. Thus, the armies of the Druchae rally, to go forth and pillage, kill, and destroy.
To the northeast live the Elegians, the most common victim of Druchae incursions. In the east, the Ulthanians live on their islands and underwater fortresses, and the Druchae continue to find creative ways in which to attack them. The Cursed Isle remains, far to the north, always watching. They are to far away to do much damage, but several conflicts have occurred. In the east, the Holy Lake separates them from the Methanans, but the Methanan colonies are always easy to target, as they are across the Holy Lake, and share a border with the Druchae. The Karoth's colonies are also to be found here, but the Druchae admire the Karoth's heartless and vile customs, and many alliances have been formed between the two. The Medeans live across the Straits of the Karoth, but the Druchae rarely attack them. And last, but not least, Salik's fleets often pass through those same straits, bribing their way through. But rarely has there been conflict between the Druchae and these foreigners.

So no doubt, the Druchae have many nations that they might pillage and destroy. They are never in need of a target, and once, they even sailed all the way west, to Darnor and Paknir, just to try out some new land. While they have only truly eradicated one nation, they continue to destroy and obliterate all they can reach. Now, let's examine the history of the Druchae.

The Early Age began with the destruction of the Gathrich. These peaceful neighbors were crushed and utterly destroyed. The half dragons and corrupted warriors feasted and indulged for seven full months over the destruction. Then, they moved on. At the same time, they began to build a fleet, to attack the creatures in the sea, which were soon to name themselves Ulthanians. For a while, they simply pillaged and destroyed. Since the Methanans did not form their colonies until the Middle Age, the Druchae controlled much of their peninsula. They also met the Karoth, and attacked the Ulthanians under their first pure Half Dragon Lord, Driach. While they were unable to reach the underwater fortresses, many islands fell to them, which weakened the Ulthanians enough that the Karoth could attack them. The noble sea dwellers were threatened with total destruction, but managed to survive. In the meantime, Driach turned his army towards Elegia. Weak and vulnerable, he decided it was time to destroy them and move north. So he gathered men from Orbarach, half dragons from his entourage and followers, and even a few drakes from the mountains. These, he led into Elegia, slaughtering all before him. Yet now, the Dawn King, Elegia's first king, rode forth, and defeated the army, and killed Driach in single combat. The Druchae were shocked, and retreated far back. A small known fact of this war is that the army of the Druchae actually fought several battles against the Tsang Mirai, who were also invading the Elegians at the time, although in much smaller numbers. Regardless, both were destroyed, and the Druchae were left to brood. It was now that their allies came down from the moon of Nerethra, to sap souls, kill the pure, and destroy the world. With the help of the Erethnikai, the Druchae's armies once again swelled, but no other massive incursions were made.

With the Early Age gone and the Middle Age at hand, the Druchae's prospect of pillaging for free vanished. All the nations around them were unified and had armies strong enough to fight back. Regardless, the Methanans now made their colonies, and these isolated bits of land were superb targets for the Druchae. The Methanans soon had to hole up in fortresses, and many dielos warriors fell before the halberdiers arrived to disperse the Druchae. Now, however, a new Half Dragon Lord arose. Shrak of Erlon, Half Dragon Lord of the Druchae. He decided that the hated Elegians were going to be destroyed in fire and death. Thus, he gathered his armies, corrupted men, half dragons, Erethnikai, and more. Then, they marched to the land bridge between Elegia and the Druchae. Yet Shrak's plan was different from those of his predecessors. While the Sea of Pain was said to be home to more monsters, apparitions, and curses than had been recounted by all the survivors together, (there were about three, all told,) it would for that reason be the most unexpected attack route for the Elegians. He knew to cross the Holy Lake would be to lose his army in the pureness and perfection of the place, and the land bridge would take many months to take, but the Sea of Pain... so he gathered a large part of his army onto the ships and sent them across. The result was simple. Massive beasts took down ships. Curses caused them to catch on fire and snap in half. Illusions drove soldiers mad with horror. Yet the army was simply to large. Roughly a score of ships made it, each with five score soldiers. And so it was that two thousand Druchae marched around the lands, obliterating all in their path. King Derwin, king of Elegia at the time, was shocked. He pulled thousands of knights against the Druchae. In fact, he was so afraid of this new army, he brought all of his knights to fight the Druchae. They were destroyed, but it was to late. Seeing the knights leaving, Shrak ordered a massive assault. With no knights, no Elegians dared move towards the drakes Shrak sent forth. Only Moriathor Dragonslayer, still a youth, was able to wound one, but was soon hurt and sent to a healing house. The armies of the Elegians could not remain, and fled wholesale. Shrak then advanced throughout the southern lands, burning and pillaging to an extent equaled only by Driach, the first to invade Elegia. While his army was finally defeated at the Battle of Dronir's Horn, Shrak survived.
Shrak now decided to attack the Ulthanians. He made pacts with all the Karoth he could find, and soon he had rallied them on the Druchae's coast. Yet the Ulthanians struck first, killing many Karoth and sinking almost the whole Druchae fleet. With that option gone, Shrak rebuilt the fleet and went across the ocean to Darnor. For a small while the goatmen were slaughtered, but then an invading army from Paknir came in, and Orthik the Beastlord cut off Shrak's ear before he was killed. Shocked by his apparent vulnerability, Shrak left, but was killed by vengeful Darnorian warriors as he tried to leave.
For the rest of the Middle Age, the Druchae did very little. The Moon Lord went to Paknir, Arnuch Foeseeker died of old age, and no great warriors remained to hold the armies together. Thus, the rest of the Middle Age was spent in idleness.

Now came the Golden Age. For the Druchae, the golden bit was about their exploits. They raided Elegia, Methanan colonies, Ulthania, and even the Medeans, for a brief time. They also captured a massive fleet full of Salik commerce. All in all, it was a raider's heaven. Yet soon, the Druchae received commanders as well. The Half Dragon Lords Melgrar and Irak led great crusades into Ulthania, and the corrupted warriors followed Ardruch Mankiller into the rich Elegian lands. Finally, however, the Half Dragon Lord Erlon rallied a great army and attacked Elegia. King Drunias was killed in single combat by Erlon, but Erlon was killed by knights while raiding a village. This concluded the first war. Yet Erlon's presence had been so incredible, the Druchae soon regrouped, wanting more war. So they attacked again, but Gelin of Erl and Prince Ziri beat them back. Yet the third war was different. Scrolls of Shrak's army's travels across the Sea of Pain were found, and the Druchae crossed. This time, the army was huge, and the knowledge of the dangers before them allowed the Druchae to pass across it easily. Soon, a massive army strolled across Elegia, massacring and pillaging. The Half Dragon Lord(ess?) Irithka soon took command, and the Druchae rampaged.

And the Erlon War rages on in the New Age, consuming Elegia. The Ulthanians, too, feel the wrath of the Druchae, who even now bring their fleet towards the noble sea dwellers, followed by great armies of Karoth. Even the Medeans are looking uneasy, as the Methanan colonies suffer under relentless attacks. And so, oh great warrior, it is up to you. Lead the Druchae on to ultimate victory. Raze, pillage, leave nothing, for all must follow the Gathrich into slavery, destruction, and looting. Onward now, let none survive.
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14ascheck
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Re: Nerethra [Fantasy Game]

Post by 14ascheck » Thu Jun 25, 2009 7:35 am

OK, this is a game I was working on long, long ago. I have a line of miniatures for it, although right now they are 2-D (I'll explain this shortly,) and several Books of Lore (the equivalent of a Codex or Army Book,) as well as the main rulebook, although the background section was still underway when I got bored of it. It's pretty old, from when I was eight, so I was wondering if anyone was interested in helping me with upgrading it to a 40K or FoW standard. Here are the Books of Lore (I've turned up another one, but it's half done,) and the rulebook. Tell me what you think. P.S. I hadn't playtested it yet, so there're no points costs.

Nerethra

Nerethra is a game in which you build up your armies, then lead them to war to obliterate all who stand against you. It is a game of cunning and strategy, or brute force and slaughter, whichever you prefer. So let's delve into this world of life and death, victory and defeat.

The Countries

The first step here is to pick your army. This is the force which you will use on the battlefield. Here is an overview of all of the armies found in Nerethra.
Elegia
The Druchae
Methana
Salik
The Zilanchi are another country, probably the foulest of all. The Zilanchi are much like the Salik, but they are stronger, more deadly, and they wield much more powerful magics. Their ruling caste wear long cloaks, while their serfs wear chain mail. The serfs themselves are weak, only viable for military service because of their magic. The Zilanchi cavalry is called the Ilithik. These Zilanchi are lesser nobles, who ride nightmarish horses which flicker and dissipate like smoke as they move. The Zilanchi are a small nation, on the northern fringes of the world, and they ride to war often, if only for the ecstasy that comes with the pain of others. Their sadism knows no bounds; many say they are no more than a physical manifestation of pain incarnate. Yet as time has gone on, their evil has infected the land they live on. The only reason the Zilanchi have never been conquered by larger nations is that no army can invade and survive off of the barren lands. In fact, the land is so evil, supply convoys and scouts have been found, destroyed by freak earthquakes or falling into pits. Indeed, the Zilanchi are the most twisted race of Nerethra.
Also known as Ironfolk, the Methond were born from stone and given life. Ever since, these truculent little fellows trundle about their halls, delighting in the stonework and carvings on the walls. Yet often, they are threatened by their greatest enemy, the Tsang Virai, and they take up their war hammers to obliterate the invaders. The Cursed Isle also remains just offshore, and they must battle against this as well. So the Methond are no stranger to war; do not underestimate them due to their size, they have the courage and heart of kings. Leading them are the Ironborn, strong and clever Methond who wield war hammers of unparalleled size. To guard them, the Ironguard stands ready; and, if needed, the common Methond will raise his hammer, blink his stone eyes, and charge into the fray as Ironfolk. While they are pleasant and welcoming in peace, they will fight to the death in war. So live the Methond.
Darnor
Paknir
Elves
Tsang Virai
The Druids
The Cursed Isle
Karoth
Kobolds
Ulthania
The Caveborn

The Rules

These rules are fairly simple, so that you can play fast, yet fun games. Each turn has a basic organization.
1. Attacker moves.
2. Defender moves.
3. Attacker shoots.
4. Defender shoots.
5. Attacker charges.
6. Defender charges.
7. Attacker melees.
8. Defender melees.
9. Magic Phase (Throughout all of the above)
In this way, things are kept fairly up to date in the game. You can either designate an attacker, or have a rolling match. This is effectively a show down between dice, where you roll, and the highest picks which of the (usually two) choices he prefers. If it's a tie, reroll. On to formations.

Formations are made for ease of playing. You have to understand that Epic is a game of massed troops, where a battalion can cover a few square inches. So formations are when troops are gathered to move, etc., together. It depends on the time period and the type of soldier just how many troops are in a formation, but for these rules we are going to assume that one subunit is two ranks of five. Now one of the advantages of the formation is that you can move them together. To do this, take one of our formation bases, print it out on cardboard paper, (although I find construction paper, usually green, to be the coolest, although sometimes it bends to easily,) bend the ends as shown, and you can snugly fit the troops in. Make sure that the formation bases are the right ones for the subunit. That word has come up twice now; a subunit is one group on the same base. A unit is a group of subunits, usually four, that make up one group, such as a regiment. For example: four subunits, each two ranks of six, make up one Man at Arms Company. Simple. Oh, and one big point: you cannot augment the bases. Since measuring is performed from the edge of the formation's base, you can actually strengthen/weaken a unit in this way. Make sure your opponent doesn't mind this. Now to the turn.

The movement phase is simple. Each side moves. Check the specific scenario for the statistics of the participants. A move is usually a few inches. You can change direction only once in a move, unless the unit's rules say otherwise. This is simply because especially in the age of linear warfare changing direction meant completely reorganizing the formation, so it was something not done unless necessary. In any case, it can take some time, so only once per move may you turn them. There is, however, no limit of degrees the turn may be a complete reversal, or a simple quarter turn. It's up to you. Almost all cavalry may make two turns, but it's easier for us just to write it in in the unit's rules in the scenario, since there can be exceptions.
Terrain is also an important aspect of movement. Naturally you can't just move through a house, woods, etc. We'll cover these elements one at a time.
Terrain that is hard to traverse. With this, it can vary slightly. In woods, a swamp, etc., it's usually best to say that a unit may only move half of its usual movement value. You can also limit this by percentage, or taking of an inch or two, depending on just how obstructive the terrain is. We suggest, however, that you use the previously mentioned method as a default. We also suggest that a subunit must split into skirmish form to enter terrain.
Buildings. We believe in making games realistic, so why shouldn't troops be able to enter buildings? Naturally cavalry and other such things should be kept out of this rule, but infantry can garrison houses. See cover saves, below. To move into a building, just place the subunit moving in onto it, or take it off the field and leave a marker, etc., to show where it is. Also, a building should have a capacity. Naturally you can't put a regiment into one farmhouse. In general, one subunit is the best capacity.
The last aspect that is in the movement category is skirmishing. This isn't really movement, more a variation of formations, but we decided to put it here. The basic idea is that a subunit wants to break up, instead of staying in formation. You'll probably find that units will want to go into skirmish for two main reasons: one, a subunit can split fire, (see shooting,) and two, a subunit may need to to traverse terrain. To go into skirmish form, you must, however, sacrifice 20%/one fifth of your movement. If there is an ongoing decimal in eighths of inches, round up. Many units are Skirmishers, and thus do not have to sacrifice this percentage.

The shooting phase is also fairly easy. All you do is select which units that are able to shoot you wish to shoot with, and they fire. To do this, you must first determine range.
To be in range, the unit you are firing at must be at least as close as the number of inches in the Range statistic box in the firing unit's profile. Measure from the edge of the formation's base. A formation must be facing the enemy with it front rank to fire. If the front rank can reach the enemy, the whole formation may fire. If it is within range, then you may shoot. To determine which firing value you use, check the distance again. If the range is half of the firing unit's total range or more, use its Far Shot value. If it doesn't have one, just use the Shot value. A Shot value has a number and usually a plus sign. For example, 4+. This means you need to roll at least a four for each soldier in the unit. The only time there isn't a plus sign is if it's a six, because you can't have more than six. Note that a formation may only shoot at one target.
So you roll one die for each soldier in the formation. Then, you tally up the hits. For example, a subunit of eight troops is shooting and needs a 4+ to hit. The subunit rolls five hits, so the enemy would lose five soldiers. However, there are also saves. A conventional save is on the unit's profile, for example 5+. So if the defending subunit rolls two saves, the attacking/firing unit only kills three of the defenders.
There are, however, several other saves. The first is the cover save. You must assign each piece of terrain on the field with a cover save, or state that it has none. For example, if the defending subunit is in a building made of wood, a 4+ or 5+ save would be typical. For a stone wall, probably a 4+. For trees, a 4+, as the troops are concealed. And for a swamp, maybe a 6, since there could be brush, etc. You get the idea.
The other save is the skirmish form save. This save comes from a formation going into skirmishing form. It is almost always 6. While we are on skirmishing formations, I should mention two things, splitting fire and loss of directed fire. Loss of directed fire is simple. For every hit you make with a subunit in skirmishing form, roll a die. On a one, the hit doesn't count. Splitting fire is equally simple. While a subunit in standard formation is only capable of selecting one target, a skirmishing subunit may split its unit in half and shoot at one target with each half.

Charging is the shortest timewise of all the phases. You simply select all units that are capable of charging and that you want to charge, and they advance by a number of inches given on their unit statistics. Their front rank must be able to make solid contact with either an enemy unit's side, front, or back. You may not charge if you cannot hit an enemy unit. Then you proceed to melee.

The melee phase is fairly quick. All units in contact with an enemy unit must melee. You cannot skip a melee. To execute a melee, just use the Melee Value statistic on the unit's profile. It, like the shooting one, should look like 2+, 3+, etc. Then, just like shooting, you roll to hit, and then for saves. Note that only conventional saves (ones on the unit's profile,) count in melee. You then remove casualties from the back ranks.
While we're here, there is one more factor of the game. Morale. Morale is also quite simple. If a subunit loses 50% of all its troops in one turn, make a morale save. The number you need (3+,4+, etc.) is indicated in the unit profile. If it fails, the subunit must retreat as far as its movement allows, towards the board edge from where it came. Note that if it came on in a different area from the rest of the army, it will fall back towards them. At the beginning of every turn, take a morale save. If you succeed, the unit turns about and is ready to move as normal. If it fails, keep running. A unit attacked while retreating surrenders and is removed without a fight. If a morale save is unusual, such as one caused by a spell, etc., roll it at the end of the phase, unless stated otherwise.

The magic phase is different from all other phases for one simple reason: it isn't one. We have only called it a phase because it makes things simpler. While phases are parts of a whole turn, the magic phase goes on throughout the turn. Use magic when it is directed in the spell. If it requires a harnessing test to control the magic in use, roll a die. On a 1, you fail the spell, and nothing happens.

There are also several types of troops. These are irrelevant except in special rules, where some examples exclude some types. For example, an instant kill spell may be usable against anything except commanders and heroes, since they're too powerful to make that fair.

I realize these rules are quite loose and don't cover a few things. That's intentional, as they're more a guide than a real rulebook. Just tweak thing or add things to suit your needs. This makes for a more precise gaming experience.

A final thing is historical combat. There are four ages of Nerethran history: the Early Age, the Middle Age, the Golden Age, and the New Age. Almost all heroes have assigned ages. While you do not have to play this way, as it can be hard sometimes to organize a game that way, (for example: both sides have picked characters to fit their armies perfectly, but they are from different ages, which will inconvenience one or both of them, as they will have to pick a character to match the other's age,) we suggest that in a campaign you apply this. In historical refights, you will obviously also have to do this.
Elegia

This Book of Lore is on Elegia. Inside you will find, in this order, some special Elegian rules and items, spells, the rules for the warriors and heroes of Elegia, and a brief history of those same warriors.

The Elegian Army

The Elegians tend to work best if balanced out, with a bit of everything. However, a force of rangers or Cavalry breaks up the monotony quite nicely. Again, most people stick with a bit of everything, and lead that to battle.

First, spells, etc. The Elegian army centers on magical fighters who are at the same time able to do great damage to enemy heroes. This means that a variety of spells to specialize their talents can be most useful. Thus, a list has been compiled.

The Elegians also have many spells to aid and protect their soldiers. A spell cast in the right place at the right time can be invaluable, and is even capable of turning the tide of a battle. So choose carefully.... NOTE: Each spell may only be used once per turn by the same unit.
Undying Light: This light is stunning to all enemies of Elegia. An enemy hero or formation must pass a morale save to attack the user. This spell is passive, meaning that it is not used at a certain time; it is always in effect. Range: 18".
Lightning Bolt: The Mages from the Tower of the Heavens have learned impressive magic to keep safe the people who live below them. The user can select an enemy formation; if the user then passes a harnessing test, he may roll a die. The number you roll is the number of times you may attack the formation with a 4+ ranged attack. If the whole formation dies before all attacks are used, you may not use the rest. Range: 19".
Dispel Evil: The enemies of Elegia are many, and sometimes the Elegians need to kill many at once. Dispel Evil requires a harnessing test; if it is passed, select an enemy formation. That formation then suffers [number of soldiers in the formation] 5+ hits against it. Range: 19".
Polymorph: It can be highly amusing (and thus morale boosting,) as well as useful to nearby Elegians to see one of their enemies turned into a sheep. If the user passes a harnessing test, he may direct a 4+ attack at any soldier in an enemy formation, excluding heroes and commanders. If he succeeds, trade the soldier for a sheep, and in the next turn all Elegians within 6" of the sheep may reroll failed morale saves. The sheep cannot be killed; it moves with the formation. If the whole formation is killed before the end of the turn in which the sheep grants morale rerolls, it remains until the end of the turn, but cannot move. Range: 16".
Shield: The spellcasters of Elegia have mastered many ways of protecting their soldiers. The user may select one formation per turn; if he passes harnessing test, he grants that formation a +1 save. Note that a unit can never have a 1+ save, even with multiple spells and items. Range: 12".

The Elegians have a wealth of heroes and soldiers they can call upon in need. This is a list of all of them, and their rules. Here is an example profile.
Name
Description
Points Cost. Cost to buy a unit or formation.
Speed. The amount of inches that this unit may move.
Attack. The die roll needed to wound an enemy.
Conventional Save. The save needed to deflect an attack.
Range. How far the model can shoot, measured from its base. If it says melee, the unit may only attack enemies in base contact. First Hit Melee is equally straightforward. This unit may strike before the other in melee.
Morale. The unit's morale save. If it says Fearless, it means that the unit passes all test automatically.
Life. The amount of hits the unit can take before it is removed.
Spells & Items. Any spells or items the unit can buy, and the points cost.
Special Rules. Any special rules that apply.

Heroes

King Argaroth (New Age)
King Argaroth is the current ruler of Elegia. He is valiant and true, leading his men into battle on his steed, Eriadir. This pegasus was hatched in the royal stables, and has been bred specifically for the king. Indeed, a strong bond has developed between the two. Many times they have saved each other's lives, and they operate in perfect harmony on the battlefield. The King is an inspiring force when his men see him, and he can rally many soldiers merely by showing himself.
PC.
S. 7"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 4
S. Shield.
SR. Inspiring: Any soldiers within 6" of King Argaroth that are fleeing may reroll failed morale tests.

Erthenior (Golden Age)
Erthenior was the Keeper of the Keys, a position with great influence and power, in Elegia under King Erthas. When Erthas died, Erthenior was cast out of the court by Elneth, the traitor son of Erthas, who plotted to ally himself with the Druchae. Yet Erthenior courageously led a band of soldiers into the castle, and killed Elneth in a duel, in which he lost his left arm. He was made king and ruled for a few years after before the wound and its aftereffects finally killed him.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 3+
CS. 3+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. None.
SR. Undying Loyalty: When Erthenior is killed, he may attack an enemy in melee (if he is not in melee, this does not apply,) as a free attack.

Gelin of Erl (Golden Age)
Gelin was a farmer for most of his life, but was summoned to King Borlatur's side when the kingdom was in dire danger from the Druchae. A prophecy had fortold that Gelin was to save the kingdom at this time of peril, but Gelin wanted no part in it and returned home... only to find his house burned down and his family dead. He killed the half dragon general leading the attack, and scattered even the Erethnikai in his fury, art the Battle of Ergoth's Keep. Thus, he did indeed save the kingdom, but was scarred forever. He spent the rest of his life hunting evil tirelessly.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 2+
CS. 4+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. Dispel Evil.
SR. Boundless Fury: In the first turn of a melee, Gelin hits on a 2+.

Moriathor Dragonslayer (Middle Age)
The greatest dragon slayer of all time, Moriathor killed over a dozen drakes. While this may seem a small number, killing one drake is often by far the greatest deed of a knight. So killing over a dozen is an incredible feat, and remains unsurpassed. Moriathor was very zealous in his pursuit, however, and many left his war band because he seemed insane. And in the end, he was indeed ambushed and killed by Shrak, the Half Dragon Lord of the Druchae, as he believed himself invincible.
PC.
S. 5"
A. 2+
CS. 3+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 4
S. None.
SR. None.

The Dawn King (Early Age)
The Dawn King is the semi-mythical first king of Elegia. It is difficult to separate fact from fiction about this ruler, and few could say exactly what he did and what he didn't. Regardless, his deeds are great in number. He has vanquished innumerable enemies, taken endless amounts of land, and acquired vast treasures for the Elegians, his beloved subjects. His end was at the hands of Meshka Lithkar, the witch of the Northern Isle, who told him that if he did not sacrifice himself, she would destroy his kingdom. True to her word, after he had sacrificed himself before her, she left the Elegians in peace.
PC.
S. 7"
A. 3+
CS. 2+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 5
S. Shield.
SR. None.

Semperis Turith (Golden Age)
Semperis was the leader of the militia, fighting for Prince Ziri in the Erlon wars. His legacy was forming the militia into a usable force, so that it would not just serve as a screen for the men at arms. This earned him the gratitude of the common man, for many were saved by his innovative training techniques, and the efficiency of the Elegian army was much improved. He was also a skilled diplomat, who could discuss things even with the Zilanchi, who rarely listened to reason. He retired from service and lived a long life after the wars.
PC.
S. 5"
A. 4+
CS. 3+
R. 6"
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. None.
SR. Scout: Semperis Turith's movement is unaffected by terrain, excepting water and other impassable terrain pieces.

Commanders

Elegian Nobleman
The Elegians pick nobles to command their armies. These nobles march into battle and tactfully lead their men against the enemy. Often, they bear standards to rally men, which can surprise an enemy. Their courage and nobility commanding is what holds the Elegian army together.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 3+
CS. 4+
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 3
S. None.
SR. Mounted: For points, you may give an Elegian Nobleman a horse, increasing his speed to 7".

Retinues

Elegian Retinue (Formation; 1 Stand)
Many Elegian heroes and commanders prefer to have a retinue to protect them. This group forms a living shield, fighting fanatically to protect its commander. The retinues also often have standards to rally the men around them. These soldiers are also the elites of the army, handpicked to kill all who threaten their lord. All heroes and commanders may take an Elegian Retinue for its points cost.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 3+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Fanatical: All hits directed at the Elegian Retinue's lord are transferred to the Elegian Retinue automatically.

Infantry

Militia (Formation; 8 Stands)
When the Elegians need more men, they recruit Militia. They simply walk into villages and demand a male from each family. These untrained soldiers are weak, but provide plenty of manpower for the Elegian war machine.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 6
CS. -
R. Melee
M. 5+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. None.
Militia Commander (Part of Militia Formation; Command Stand) Commander
The militia are an untrained rabble, so they need soldiers with some combat experience to command them. Thus, the kingdom promotes men at arms to Militia Commanders, so that they can rally and form them into an organized fighting force.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 5+
CS. 6
R. Melee
M. 5+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. None.

Men At Arms (Formation; 6 Stands)
Men at Arms are the standard fighting force of the Elegians. Each noble keeps his stock of them. They are more expendable than knights, yet still relatively good at fighting. Another advantage they possess is their durability. Men at Arms have been known to march through a hail of arrows unfazed, thanks to their discipline and armor.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 4+
CS. 5+
R. Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Shield Wall: A Men at Arms formation has a conventional save of +1 when the attack against it is ranged.
Captain (Part of Men at Arms Formation; Command Stand) Commander
Men at arms also need firm commanders to lead them and keep them in order. To achieve this, the nobles train the best men at arms to command their comrades. This arrangement works especially well because the men at arms have already fought alongside their Captain in other battles, assuring a strong trust between the ranks and command.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 3+
CS. 5+
R. Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Shield Wall: A Men at Arms formation has a conventional save of +1 when the attack against it is ranged.

Rangers (Formation; 4 Stands)
Rangers are the elite of the kingdom, hiding in the woods except in times of great danger. Then, they come forth to defend their hallowed realms, by shooting their bows into the enemy with flawless aim. Their cloaks also aid them in disguising themselves, and their daggers and bows make short work of even the toughest enemies.
PC.
S. 5"
A. 3+
CS. 3+
R. 8"
M. 2+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Woodsmen: Wooded terrain does not slow a Rangers formation.
Warden (Part of Rangers Formation; Command Stand) Commander
The Wardens are the oldest and most clever of all rangers. Even more skilled in the arts of disguise and concealment than their followers, they provide an even deadlier force against enemies. They are also well known for their solitude, which is even greater than that of normal rangers.
PC.
S. 5"
A. 3+
CS. 2+
R. 8"
M. 2+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Woodsmen: Wooded terrain does not slow a Rangers formation.

Pikeman Company (Formation; 6 Stands)
The Pikemen are an anti cavalry unit, used in large blocks by the Elegians to guard their flanks. They never received a truly central role in the army, as men at arms are still a more versatile combatant, but they grant their own benefits when used well. They are also devastating when charged, as their pikes strike men before they can lock in combat.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 5+
CS. 5+
R. First Hit Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Anti Cavalry: Pikemen formations receive a +2 on their attacks against cavalry.
Vassal (Part of Pikeman Formation; Command Stand) Commander
Vassals are non-nobles equaled in power only by knights. Since pikemen are often used as ceremonial and decorative units, it seems only proper that Vassals, the most trusted in the nobles' entourages, should lead them. This gives the Vassals a chance to be seen at the head of the battle array, which in turn can elevate their status.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 5+
CS. 4+
R. First Hit Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Anti Cavalry: Pikemen formations receive a +2 on their attacks against cavalry.

Cavalry

Knightly Order (Formation; 4 Stands)
The Knights are the best fighters in the kingdom. Handpicked by the nobility, these men are tireless defenders of honor and justice. They ride on their mounts, destroying all in their path in headlong charges and assaults. To add to their power, they are also speedy troops, on the best steeds available.
PC.
S. 6"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S. None.
SR. Headlong Charge: A Knights formation may ride through an enemy formation into another enemy formation. They must be able to place their base firmly on them ground however; they can't stop in the middle of the formation they are going through. For the formation the Knights ride through, make a morale save. If it fails, they retreat around the Knights toward their board edge. If the ridden-through formation passes, the Knights must roll a die. On a 4-6, kill any one non-commander or hero stand in the formation they are riding through.
Head of Order (Part of Knights Formation; Command Stand) Commander
A Head of Order is a knight with his own group of knights. Each knightly formation is an order, with different heraldry and colors. Thus, a Head of Order controls an entire faction of knights, a massive responsibility and privilege. Naturally only able knights are selected, and someone of such stature is guaranteed to be a hard fighter and skilled tactician.
PC.
S. 6"
A. 2+
CS. 2+
R. First Hit Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S. Dispel Evil.
SR. Headlong Charge: A knights formation may ride through an enemy formation into another enemy formation. They must be able to place their base firmly on them ground however; they can't stop in the middle of the formation they are going through. For the formation the knights ride through, make a morale save. If it fails, they retreat around the knights toward their board edge. If the ridden-through formation passes, the knights must roll a die. On a 4-6, kill any one non-commander or hero stand in the formation they are riding through.

Men at Arms Mounted (Formation; 6 Stands)
Men at Arms are also useful when riding horses into battle. They are able to move faster, thus locking with enemy formations faster and more efficiently. They are also useful as mobile reserves, easily redeployed to fight off new threats or enemy forces breaking through your lines. This has given them a superb reputation around the kingdom.
PC.
S. 7"
A. 4+
CS. 4+
R. Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. None.
Mounted Captain (Part of Men at Arms Mounted Formation; Command Stand) Commander
Men at arms captains are obviously needed for the mounted units as well, so the Elegian nobles select their best riders among the captains, and pick them accordingly. These soldiers are then made into Mounted Captains, men ready to ride into battle at the forefront of a wave of men and horses, slaughtering all in their path.
PC.
S. 7"
A. 3+
CS. 4+
R. Melee
M. 3+
L. 1
S. None.
SR. None.

Spellcasters

Mage
The Mages of the Tower of the Heavens have always been willing to aid their empire in war, placing their formidable spellcasting abilities at the disposal of the king. They walk around the battlefield, shooting spells into the ranks of the enemy and shielding their own. Do not underestimate them; it will be your last act.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 5+
CS. -
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 2
S. Undying Light, Lightning Bolt, Shield, Polymorph.
SR. Extra Spells: A Mage may use two spells per turn, instead of the usual of one.
Siege Weapons

Trebuchet
The mighty Trebuchets, forged in the royal smithies, are useful in siege and assault, obliterating fortresses and tearing huge gaps in formations. They are a deadly attribute, often firing far outside the range of the enemy's weapons. This makes them an invaluable addition to the Elegian war hosts.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 3+
CS. 4+
R. 16"
M. Fearless
L. 3
S&I. None.
SR. Long Ranged Pitch: the Trebuchet may only fire at enemies no closer than 3".
Trebuchet Crew (Formation; 1 Stand, connected to the Trebuchet)
Naturally crews must be assembled to man the trebuchets, so men are recruited from far and wide, men with an eye for distance and bearing. These troops are quickly set to firing the massive war machines, as well as tending to them in everyday life. Their devotion is so intense, they refuse to leave their trebuchets, even when in dire danger.
PC.
S. 4"
A. 6
CS. -
R. Melee
M. Fearless
L. 1
S&I. None.
SR. Crew: If the whole Trebuchet Crew is destroyed, the Trebuchet is automatically removed.

The Story of Elegia

Elegia is divided into provinces. Each of these has the following: a chapter of knights, which varies in size; a baron or baroness to rule it; a capital, containing the castle in which said baron or baroness lives; and a population which pays taxes to fund the king's enterprises. In this way, the king may call upon the knights, to fight with him in war; the baron or baroness, to gather militia and men-at-arms to his aid; the castle, which he can use as a bastion if necessary; and the money of the taxed populace, with which he can outfit even more soldiers. So you see, the provincial system is extremely effective when it comes to war. It is also easier on the king, who doesn't have to deal with every petty matter, since the barons and baronesses can do that.
So it is that Elegia can rally huge armies to its side if it is threatened, or wishes to conquer new land from the evil forces in the world. Geologically and politically, the Elegians are almost surrounded by enemies, so it is quite useful to have these armies at the ready. To the southwest, there is a small land bridge, between the the Sea of Pain and the Holy Lake, which is always contested by the Elegians and their neighbors, the Druchae. This land bridge is all that keeps the hordes of the Druchae from running free across the Elegians' southern reaches. To the south, the Holy Lake, which is in fact a sea, separates them from the southern lands of the Medeans. In the southeast, they share a border with the Salik, always willing to pillage and raid their lands. To the west, Paknir, the desert land of monstrous beasts and more, looms. And to the north: the legions of the Tsang Virai and Tsang Mirai howl, waiting for the chance to feast on soft, warm Elegian flesh. Yet to the Northeast, there is a small empire which still offers aid: the Methond, always willing to send their stone forged armies against their enemies, the Tsang Mirai. And to the East, the great Ocean breaks upon the Elegian shores. In that ocean, the Cursed Isle sits, the Elegians most hated enemy, for the murderer of the Dawn King, Meshka Lithkar, was the witch of said isle, long ago, and the Elegians still seek revenge.
So it is quite clear that the Elegians have suffered long and hard just to survive against these numberless enemies. The knights are simply invaluable, being cavalry, since they can redeploy quickly; if it were not for them, Elegia would long ago have succumbed to evil. Yet now that you know the current situation of the Elegians, perhaps their past would be useful to know. Let us begin at the beginning, with the Early Age.
Elegia was once simply a mass of warring feudal states, more occupied with fighting each other than repelling outsiders. Had the Elegians been stronger from the start, they might not have lost dozens of provinces to invaders from all sides.
What finally drew them together was, ironically, the Druchae. The everlasting foe finally defeated the armies of Bintria, the province possessing the land bridge at the time, and, with its numberless armies, swept across Elegia. Finally forced to put aside their differences, the Elegians went to war. Yet they could not dispel the great might of the half dragons, and would surely have fallen, had it not been for the first king. Yes, the Dawn King rode forth to pull together the great armies of Elegia, and the Elegians' love for him was so great, they threw aside their hatreds and rode behind him, great waves of knights in shining colors. The Druchae were stunned. They sent forth a drake, Melgrath, strongest of his kind, but he was cloven in half by the great king, who tricked Melgrath into entering a cave that was precisely big enough for him to fit, but with just enough room on each side to allow a human to squeeze past. There was a single niche in the cave, and after the Dawn King had lured him in, Melgrath was unable to turn when the Dawn King cut him in half. Then, after the drake had stopped its thrashing, he made his way along the side, barely squeezing through. This shocked the Half Dragon Lord Driach, who then fought the Dawn King in single combat. He was killed in the duel, and the Druchae retreated. Several years followed, but Driach had been the son of Meshka Lithkar, witch of the Cursed Isle, and she wanted revenge. She summoned the armies of the Cursed Isle to her, and threatened to obliterate the Elegians if she did not receive the Dawn King as sacrifice. The Elegians were so completely loyal, they refused, but the Dawn King himself went, and sacrificed himself.
Thus ended the Early Age, and the Elegians were but a budding empire. Now came the Middle Age, and they began to grow, fighting to reclaim lands from their enemies, going on crusade after crusade. It was in these crusades that they first met the Methond, and allied themselves with the sturdy people of stone to destroy the Tsang Mirai, the Methond's greatest foe, and no friend of the Elegians either. And so it was that many provinces were reclaimed. But Shrak of Erlon, Half Dragon Lord of the Druchae, decided enough was enough. The upstart Elegians were going to be destroyed in fire and death. Thus, he gathered his armies, corrupted men, half dragons, Erethnikai, and more. Then, they marched to the land bridge. Yet Shrak's plan was different this time. While the Sea of Pain was said to be home to more monsters, apparitions, and curses than had been recounted by all the survivors together, (there were about three, all told,) it would for that reason be the most unexpected attack route for the Elegians. He knew to cross the Holy Lake would be to lose his army in the pureness and perfection of the place, and the land bridge would take many months to take, but the Sea of Pain... so he gathered a large part of his army onto the ships and sent them across. The result was simple. Massive beasts took down ships. Curses caused them to catch on fire and snap in half. Illusions drove soldiers mad with horror. Yet the army was simply to large. Roughly a score of ships made it, each with five score soldiers. And so it was that two thousand Druchae marched around the lands, obliterating all in their path. King Derwin, king of Elegia at the time, was shocked. He pulled thousands of knights against the Druchae. In fact, he was so shocked, he brought all of his knights to fight the Druchae. They were destroyed, but it was to late. Seeing the knights leaving, Shrak had ordered a massive assault. With no knights, no Elegians dared move towards the drakes. Only Moriathor Dragonslayer, still a youth, was able to wound one, but was soon hurt and sent to a healing house. The armies of the Elegians, brave as they were, could not remain, and fled wholesale. Shrak then advanced throughout the southern lands, burning and pillaging to an extent equaled only by Driach, the first to invade Elegia. While his army was finally defeated at the Battle of Dronir's Horn, Shrak himself survived, later killing Moriathor Dragonslayer, and invading Elegia several more times.
The other problem was Paknir. While almost never coordinated, the armies of monsters and beasts often stumbled upon Elegian lands, and wreaked havoc before the knights could find them. Realizing that there needed to be a counter measure, King Arthimil decided to build a massive wall. Each hamlet, city, and town would be made into a fortress, and the areas between linked by great walls and garrisons of seasoned veterans of the Elegian army. It took some seventy years to fully complete the wall, about a third of the Middle Age, when all was said and done, but it certainly did the trick. Admittedly, many larger monsters broke through the wall, but the time this took allowed knights and local men-at-arms to join up with the garrisons, forming formidable armies to kill the beasts.
The Middle Age drew to an end, more than two hundred years of brutal warfare and crusading to stay alive. Remember, offense is the best defense, and the Elegians took it to heart. Yet the Golden Age was just that: a golden age. It was golden for many different reasons, varying from nation to nation, but golden, all the same. For the Elegians, it was mostly an agricultural wonder. They were well fed, and many soldiers joined the army, but the only really notable military conflicts were the Erlon Wars, a series of wars against the Druchae. The first was considered a stalemate, after the leaders of both nations, King Drunias and Lord Erlon, were killed. Yet Erlon had inspired the Druchae, and they soon regrouped and attacked again. This time, Gelin of Erl and Prince Ziri defeated them, the first with his mad rage, the second with his inspiring example and valiant acts, and they retreated again. But the great hosts had not been truly destroyed, just scattered, and they once again regrouped and invaded. This time, they were unable to get past the land bridge, and for a few years there was an almost total peace in Elegia. Yet the last Erlon War was truly the worst for the then prospering nation. The armies of the Druchae found an old scroll, describing the crossing of the Sea of Pain by Shrak, long ago. It also documented precisely the route taken and the things encountered. Thus, the armies of the Druchae set out, and for the first time, travelers actually knew what they were dealing with. The army was larger, and the losses smaller, and soon many thousands of Druchae were coming forth from the mists. Armies once again attacked the Elegian south, but this time, it was a true disaster. For just then, the Golden Age ended, and the prosperity that had shined upon the world ended.
And so the Erlon War rages on in the New Age. The Druchae have found a new leader, the Half Dragon lord Irithk. Many invasions have now occurred against the Elegians, and they are once again fighting for their lives. The armies of the Druchae ransack the south, and the Elegians can't seem to dispel them once and for all. The Tsang move down from the north, slaughtering and pillaging. Ornlik the Beastlord marches out from Paknir to slaughter the forces of the Elegians, and the Cursed Isle moves closer to their shores. And now, warring lord, it is up to you to keep this failing nation alive. Good luck.
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yoyomansizzle
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Re: Nerethra [Fantasy Game]

Post by yoyomansizzle » Sun Jun 28, 2009 1:55 am

Nice usually when people need help on making games they have no foundation this is the opposite with you. I wish i could help with the game but i have no idea how.
Rengar 2012.
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14ascheck
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Re: Nerethra [Fantasy Game]

Post by 14ascheck » Sun Jun 28, 2009 5:47 pm

Well, I partly just posted it for the heck of it; the next Book of Lore is underway, and ought to be out soon.

If you can think of anything with the rules, that's what I'm looking for.

I'll try to post some 2-D minis soon.
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